“Religion, Democracy and the Arab Awakening” April 25, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism

RD&AA poster
“Religion Democracy and the Arab Awakening,” sponsored by the USC Center for Islamic Thought, Culture and Practice, the USC Knight Program in Media and Religion and Global Post, is a one-day conference aimed at advancing knowledge and strengthening coverage of a critical topic. The conference will conclude with a keynote address by Professor Tariq Ramadan at 5 p.m. in the Annenberg Auditorium. A reception will follow.

To RSVP, visit annenberg.usc.edu/RSVP

The Atlas of Global Pentecostalism, February 24-25

The USC Knight Program in Media and Religion, The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences present the Atlas of Global Pentecostalism, a dynamic database of the fastest growing religion on earth.

On Monday, February 24 at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, creators Bregtje van der Haak and Richard Vijgen will present the Atlas,  a dynamic online database that visually maps the stupendous growth of global Pentecostalism as a diverse and networked religion. The database uses global crowd sourcing, big data, cinematography, interviews and academic collaborations to provide an independent perspective on Pentecostalism as it evolves. A discussion with Donald E. Miller of the Center for Religion & Civic Culture and Jesse Miranda of the Miranda Center for Hispanic Leadership will follow.  ASC 207, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

The conversation continues on Tuesday, February 25 at the Davidson Center at USC.  The first of two panels,  “Informing Journalism: The Art of Data Stories” with Richard Vijgen, Dan McCarey, information designer with the Pulitzer Center and Jon Vidar of the Tiziano Project begins at 9 a.m.  “New Approaches to covering religion and public policy” with Bregtje van der Haak, Diane Winston, Knight Chair in Media and Religion and Jon Sawyer, Executive Director of the Pulitzer Center follows at 11 a.m.

To RSVP, please email Jillian O’Connor at jilliano@usc.edu.

Event: GlobalPost’s Sennott on “After the Arab Spring: Covering Religion and Democracy”

The Knight Program in Media and Religion presents a lunchtime forum  with Charles Sennott, the executive editor of GlobalPost, on October 10, 2013. Sennott will discuss on-the-ground reporting in the Middle East. The event will take place at noon at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, Room 207. Please RSVP by Monday, October 7 to  jilliano@usc.edu.

British Council Awards Five Bridging Voices Grants

The British Council announced today that it has awarded five grants as part of its Bridging Voices program, which supports transatlantic academic and policy dialogues on religion and international affairs.

The five grantees are British Muslims for Secular Democracy, Muslims for Progressive Values, Danish Institute for Study Abroad for “Let’s talk (and walking the walk)”; City University, London and George Mason University for “The Role of Religion in Foreign Policy and Societal Transformation: Bridging Scholarship and Policymaking”; Royal Holloway (University of London), Oxford University, Georgia State University, The Carter Center and World Affairs Council of Atlanta for “Religion, Conflict Resolution and Digital Media in the Greater Muslim World: Dialogue among Policy Makers and Researchers”; School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London) and Brandeis  University for “Gender, Religion and Equality in Public Life: Perspectives from the United States and United Kingdom”; and University of Kent, Tufts University, and University of Groningen for “Addressing the Asylum Crisis: Postsecular Contributions to Rethinking Protection in Global Politics.”

Bridging Voices is supported by a $450,000 award from the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion and International Affairs. Find out more about the project here: http://usa.britishcouncil.org/society/bridging-voices

 

British Council Announces “Bridging Voices” grants

The British Council and the Friends of the British Council are accepting applications for three-year grants for Transatlantic Dialogues on Religion and International Affairs. The grants are part of Bridging Voices, a new initiative that will support transatlantic academic and policy dialogues on issues relating to religion and international affairs.

Five grants will be awarded annually to groups of institutions on both sides of the Atlantic. The grants will fund the organization of two academic and policy dialogues over a period of one year — one in the United States and the other in the United Kingdom or elsewhere in Europe.

Through these dialogues, Bridging Voices will bring together transatlantic academics and policymakers to share their expertise on topics related to religion and international affairs. Participants will use these dialogues to exchange knowledge and develop a more accurate and nuanced understanding of religion and its role in international relations.

These dialogues will also include engagement with the media and the general public.

Bridging Voices is supported with a grant from the Henry Luce Initiative on Religion and International Affairs.

The deadline for applications is June 14, 2013. More information about the program, eligibility and the call for applications can be found on the British Council website.

International Reporting Project Offers Fellowships

The International Reporting Project announced this month that it is accepting applications for fellowships for U.S. journalists to report on religion internationally. Up to five grants to qualified journalists will be awarded this fall to support three-week long reporting trips to cover stories that deal with the role of religion in the subject country. In addition to roundtrip international airfare, the stipend will include a lump sum of $5,000 for associated expenses. The U.S. Religion Fellowship is supported by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

Applicants should propose both long- and short-form reports in a variety of media, such as online, print, radio, television, blogs and v-logs, and social media. All subjects dealing with the role of religion in the applicant’s country will be eligible.

The deadline for applications is June 28, 2013. The application form is available here.

Knight Grants Recipient G. Jeffrey MacDonald Wins Wilbur Award

Journalist G. Jeffrey MacDonald was awarded a Wilbur Award this week by the Religion Communicators Council for his report, “No Child Left Alone” for the Christian Science Monitor. The Wilbur Award honors excellence by individuals in secular media—print and online journalism, book publishing, broadcasting, and motion pictures—in communicating religious issues, values and themes during 2012.

The article was one in a series MacDonald published on the fate of volunteer mentoring programs for the 2.7 million children of inmates once federal funding for the program was cut. MacDonald’s reporting was funded with a 2011 Knight Grant for Reporting on Religion and American Public Life. Read the rest of MacDonald’s reporting here.

 

KPCC Partners with J585 – Specialized Journalism

The Knight Program in Media and Religion has again partnered with public radio station KPCC to report on religion — this time Diane Winston’s Specialized Journalism class is focusing on Catholicism. In 2010, Dr. Winston’s class contributed stories on Jews and Muslims in the Southland as well as in Israel and Palestine. In 2011, the class reported on Hindus and Muslims locally and in India. In addition to reporting on developments within the Catholic Church here in the Los Angeles area, this year the class will take a 10-day reporting trip to Ireland and Northern Ireland and send back their stories to KPCC.

Read about the KPCC’s partnership with the Knight Program here.

GlobalPost Launches “Belief” Blog

This month, GlobalPost launched “Belief,” a new blog focusing on the role of religion in shaping world events. “Belief” is part of GlobalPost and the Knight Program in Media and Religion’s new initiative to cover religion around the world, an effort made possible through the generous support of the Henry Luce Foundation.

“It’s almost impossible to understand world events today without an appreciation for the role religion plays both on the diplomatic level and on the street,” said Diane Winston, the Knight Chair in Media and Religion at Annenberg. “People’s beliefs impel them to make war, seek peace, and give their lives in God’s name. When reporters treat religion as a subset of politics, they miss the heart, soul, and strategy behind the news.”

“Belief” will present regular insights into religious stories, trends and ideas from around the world, as well as the interplay between religious and secular beliefs. Read the blog at http://www.globalpost.com/globalpost-blogs/belief and follow it on Twitter @GPBelief.

Jason Berry on “The Catholic Church and the Media: Story at the Crossroads,” February 21

jason berry pic The Knight Program in Media and Religion presents journalist Jason Berry on “The Catholic Church and the Media: Story at the Crossroads.”

What is the direction of the church, 50 years after Vatican II, and how do repoprters grapple with an institution that is eveolving to meet modern challenges even as it remains rooted in tradition?

Berry is an award-winning investigative reporter whose books include “Lead Us Not Into Temptation” (1992) and “Render Unto Rome: The Secret Life of Money in the Catholic Church (2011).

The event, co-sponsored by the Office of Religious Life, The Institute for Advance Catholic Studies and the Center for Religion and Civic Culture, takes place on Thursday, February 21 at noon at ASC 207. Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to Jillian O’Connor at jilliano@usc.edu by February 14.